Upcoming Events
2018.12.05
Gender and Medieval Studies Conference 2019: Gender and Aliens
Jan 7-10, 2019 | Durham University, UK | Demography, marriage and family; physical security and justice

Introduction: In recent years discourse around ‘aliens’, as migrants living in modern nation-states, has been highly polarised, and the status of people who are technically termed legal or illegal aliens by the governments of those states has often been hotly contested. It is evident from studies of the past, however, that the movement of people is not a recent phenomenon: in the medieval west, one of the Latin terms applied to such people was alieni (‘foreigners’, or ‘strangers’), and it is clear from the surviving evidence that there were many people in the Middle Ages who could be, and indeed were, identified as aliens.

Objectives: This conference aims to stimulate debate about the ways in which gender intersected with and related to the idea of such aliens – and, more broadly, alienation – in the medieval world. Social, political and religious attitudes to aliens and the alienated were not constant over the centuries from c. 400 to c. 1500, and nor were they uniform across the whole world. Some foreigners, as aliens, might end up integrated into the societies they entered; others might find themselves marginalised, lonely or alone; or oppressed, as outlaws, outcasts, or slaves. Gender might exacerbate or mitigate this, depending on time, place and context. Authors or artists depicting parts of the world far from and alien to their own often filled them with people or beings not like them, demonstrating the imaginative power of alterity, while the reactions of those who encountered people from distant places and observed or participated in their customs could include recognition of similarity as well as difference. Foreigners were also not the only people who might find themselves alienated from, or within, certain societies or cultures: the medieval world included many marginalised groups. The issues of aliens and alienation may be differently construed in the modern world, but they are certainly not new. The relationship of gender to these topics is complex, variable and significant.

Panel Topics: 
Panel A: The Economic Experience of Aliens and Alienation
Panel B: Alienation and Belonging in Norse Culture(s)
Panel C: Marginalisation, Byzantium, and the Middle East
Panel D: Masculinities
Panel E: Foreign Identities in Medieval Romance Literature
Panel F: Dynasty and Ethnicity
Panel G: Alienated Bodies
Panel H: Women’s Experiences of Marginalisation and Migration
Panel I: Mysticism, Mary, and Marginalistion

Organizer: The Gender & Medieval Studies Group

Link: http://medievalgender.co.uk/2019-durham/https://tinyurl.com/yb79lq6b

  About us Program Gender
Mainstreaming
Women
Status in Taiwan
News & Event APEC Project Database  
  Our Story Leadership Research & Development Resources APEC WEF APEC IAP CSW CEDAW Evolution of Laws Policies & Initiatives Gender Statistics Gender Impact Assessment The Gender Dimension of the MDGs in R. O. C. (Taiwan) Gender-Based Violence Prevention Rural Women Progress of Women's Rights Customs and Culture Women Organizations Landmarks of Women's Culture and Stories Local Implementation of Global Norms Events News E-Newsletter 2013-16 MYP 2011 project 2018 APEC GIFTS A+